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Full text of "Programme of studies for the high school"

University of Alberta Librar 



1620 2853167 9 




I rogramme of Studies 
For The Htgn Scnool 



Eullctin 7 



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ourscs 




IN 
ART 1 and 2 

DRAMATICS i anJ 2 

MUSIC 1, 2 and 3 

The outlines contained in this Bulletin ore authorized by the 
rtment of Education and supersede all other outlines 
of these courses which have appeared previous to 
September 1, 1946 



m 1629.5 
^ A3 

A35 

1946 

gr.10-12 

bull.7 

CURR 
HIST 



3I copies of this Bulletin may be hod from the Generol Office 
of the Deportment of Education at 10 cents per copy. 



Printed by A. SHNITKA, King's Printer. 
Edmonton, 1946. 




Ex LiBRIS 

Universitatis 
Albertensis 



ENGLISH TEACHING IN ART, DRAMATICS, AND MUSIC 

It is a fundamental principle of the Alberta course of studies that 
every teacher is a teacher of English. The application of this prin- 
ciple to the subjects in this Bulletin, by the nature of the subjects 
themselves becomes at once a pleasing and inevitable duty. 

In Art, good taste and appreciation and the power of artistic ex- 
pression are developed through use of a variety of media in creating 
beautiful form and color. Many teachers encourage students to 
carry these aesthetic principles into the fields of Social Studies and 
English, by using illustration and lettering in practical class projects 
and out-of-class assignments. Students' notebooks, collections of 
poetic gems, book reviews, summaries and other projects should in 
appearance if not in content exemplify to a large degree the aesthetic 
discrimination born in the Art class. 

Dramatics is, par excellence, the subject dedicated to improvement 
of Speech. Voice and diction exercises, reading and declaiming, re- 
hearsing, play writing and play production are all rich in opportuni- 
ties for language development. The plays themselves, if wisely 
chosen, will be found to contain innumerable suggestions for speech 
improvement, directly or inferentially. Hamlet's advice to the play- 
ers, for example, beginning "Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pro- 
nounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue," is not only a good les- 
son in acting but excellent advice in declaiming. 

Many opportunities arise in the Music courses to apply principles 
of English. Music is closely allied with Dramatics and English, for 
example, in Glee Club, Chorus singing, opera and oratorio. Students 
should be taught to strive for accuracy in the use of words found in 
songs. The teacher should point out, for example, that the second 
line in the chorus of Rule Britannia is a prayer, not a boast, hence 
the subjunctive form rule is used, rather than the indicative rules. 
This is similar to the use of save in God Save the King,.. Music is sec- 
ond only to Dramatics for giving training in enunciation. Its value 
for improvement in articulation, modulation and voice production is 
beyond question. 



ART 



ART 1. 

INTRODUCTION. 

This Course is intended for students of High School age who may 
elect Art as a subject; for those who need a knowledge of design to 
correlate with the Home Economics and Form and Home Mechanics 
Courses; and for those who intend to qualify for teaching. 

It is based on the assumption that all men and women need a full 
understanding of what constitutes beauty in form and color in the 
things that make up their ever-changing environment. 

The aim of the Course is to develop in the mind of the student 
aesthetic standards by which to evaluate all works of art reloting 
to the individual, the home, and the community, and to aid in releos- 
ing and directing his creative energy. 

As design is the basis of all Art, the study of the underlying prin- 
ciples should lead to a finer aesthetic discrimination on the part of 
the student. Added to this, wide experience in the selection, adap- 
tation, and creation of beautiful form and colour should develop good 
taste, appreciation, and power of artistic expression. 

In this revised Course, a departure has been made from the former 
practice of assigning a stated number of exercises to be completed 
during the year. Instead, it is required that each teacher of the 
Course shall thoroughly acquaint himself with its object, details, and 
methods. Then, after having made himself thoroughly familiar with 
the subject, he can plan exercises in line with the ideas of the 
Course. This outline is purely suggestive and flexible, so that teach- 
ers will develop any phase in which they themselves, or their classes, 
ore particularly interested. The teachers are urged to encourage 
individual interest and originality, and never to be afraid, if the 
chance offers, to step outside, or go a little beyond, what the Course 
offers. 

Each student should take Art Structure, Drawing and Colour, and 
any two of the following: 

(a) Picture Analysis, or Appreciation of Applied Arts. 

(b) Illustration and Lettering. 

(c) Creative Design. 

(d) Croft Projects. 

(e) Interior Decoration. 

(f) Costume Design. 

Since four periods per week have been allotted for class instruc- 
tion in this subject, it is to be expected that considerable time will be 
spent outside of instruction time on the completion of problems. All 



problems in Design should be developed in the class. The applica- 
tion to Craft Projects may be worked at home and brought in from 
time to time to show progress. The collection of illustrations in the 
Appreciation of Applied Arts will be an out-of-class activity. 

It is expected that each student will make some type of portfolio 
or container suitable to preserve all drawings and sketches. Rough 
sketches should be kept to show the development of ideas to the 
finished result. 

Teachers will find helpful reference material in the following: 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 
Art Structure: 

Dow: Composition (Doubleday, Page & Company). 
Goldstein: Art in Everyday Life (Mocmillon Company). 
Fenn: Abstract Design (Batsford). 

Picture Analysis: 

Littlejohn: How to Enjoy Pictures (A. & C. Block). 

Helen Gardner: Understanding the Arts (Horcourt, Brace & Com- 
pany). 

Sir Martin Conway: The Book of Art for Young People (A. & Cj 
Block). 

C. C. Pearce: Composition (Batsford). 

Good magazine illustrations, as in Country Life, Arts and Decora- 
tion, The International Studio. 

Appreciation of the Applied Arts: 

Gardner: Art Through the Ages. 
The Illustrated London News. 
Day Museum Prints (Reeves). 

Croft Work: 

F. J. Gloss: Artistic Practical Handicraft Series. 

Craft for All Series (Pitman Publishers). 

Sower: Everyday Art at School and Home (Batsford). 

D. C. Minter: Modern Home Crafts (Blackie). 
Volume 2 of Dryard Press Leaflets. 

Interior Decoration: 

Jockwoy: Principles of Interior Decoration (Mocmillon). 
Todd and Mortimer: The New Interior Decoration (Batsford). 

ART STRUCTURE. 

Aims: 

1. The application of the principles of design. 

2. The filling of given areas with well-balanced form and colour. 

3. The developing of line patterns and moss patterns. 

4 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTS 



Problems: 

1. Make static and dynamic rhythm forms in self-contained 
areas (line patterns). 

2. Make Notan patterns in self-contained areas, developed in 
charcoal, and completed in colour. 

Note: — Notan is the term for contrast of value. 

3. Make border repeats in alternations or series. 

4. Make surface patterns, as for textile, or for end papers of a 
book. 

(a) Subdivision of the surface by squares, bricks, diamonds, 
ogees, or circles. 

(b) Placing of simple motifs within the resultant areas, or at 
intersections, or both. 

(c) The working out of a value arrangement in not more than 
five steps in colour. 

(d) "Patterning'' surfaces as contrasted with flat colour 

DRAWING. 

1. (a) Single objects in line (including third dimension), as 

packing-box, carton, fruit-bosket, cool-oil con, nail-keg, 
tub. Line brush drawing may be used. 

(b) Single objects in light and &hade, as vase forms, bottles, 
lamps, kitchen utensils. Charcoal, wash drawings, or dry 
brush may be used. 

(c) Groups of three or four objects, with emphasis on com- 
position first, then the drawing, as (1) cones, cylinders, 
cubes; (2) manufactured objects. 

2. Pose drawing: — 20-minute sketches to be done at regular 
intervals throughout the year. 

COLOUR. 

Value scales in 7 or 9 steps. 

Intensity scales in 7 or 9 steps. 

Flat washes applied to drawing groups. (Compositions as in 1 (c) 
above.) 

Application in the problems that follow. 

ILLUSTRATION. 

Historic events. 

Stories from Literature. 

Dramatic incidents in a play. 

Imaginative Drawing. 

This work will be on application of composition ideas gained from 
picture analysis, combined with pose, drawing, and color. 

5 



PEN LETTERING. 

Letters in tone pattern and space filling. 
Open-closed letters. (See P's and Q's, by Tannahil.) 
Page arrangements. 
Paragraphs in pen letters with initial letters and fillers. 

CREATIVE DESIGN. 

1. Clay, or soap, or papier-mache. 

2. Block prints, by use of potato-cuts or turnip-cuts. 

3. Stencilling: — negatives developed and cut. Special care 
with ties and notan effects. Stippling or spraying of paint or 
dye on material. 

4. Leather: — decorative pattern, with thonging and lining of 
article, as, book supports, book jackets, purse. 

PICTURE ANALYSIS 

The idea of design can be strengthened if reproductions of pic- 
tures by old and modern masters are analyzed for their design quali- 
ties, as distinct from their representative, religious, moral, or anec- 
dotal qualities. Students may practise such analysis in line and tone, 
reducing the form to on abstraction stripped almost entirely of its 
representative quality; and remembering that it is design that is 
being sought — the relationship between the parts and no part for 
itself. Other methods of approach to picture analysis may be used, 
the object being to induce the student to look at the picture, to really 
see and enjoy its composition, and not merely to memorize facts 
about it or the life of the painter. 

The following set of colored pictures of marked interest in design 
of line, moss, or tone, is required: 

Daumier: The Washerwoman. 

Vermeer: Lady with Lute and Young Lady with Water Jug. 

Monet: Rocks of Belle Isle, and Fishing Boats. 

Velasquez: Lady with Fan and Surrender of Breda. 

Raphael: The Ansidei Madonna. 

Millet: The Gleaners. 

Titian: Lavinia and The Tribute Money. 

Van Gogh: Garden in Aries. 

Seurat: Le Cirque. 

Renoir: Girls at a Piano. 

Burne-Jones: The Golden Stairs. 

Whistler: Battersea Bridge. 

Other sources: 

Good examples of photography. 

Good magazine illustrations, as in Country Life; Arts and Decora- 
tion; The International Studio; The Artist. 

6 



When students are to be tested in appreciation of good composi- 
tion, it is suggested that compositions other than those used in class- 
work be used, so that picture study becomes a stimulus to looking at 
pictures, and an exercise in judgment leading to appreciation of the 
art quality in pictures. 

CRAFT PROJECTS. 

"A finished model to give the greatest satisfaction must not 
only show good craftsmanship, but must be functionally fit, 
structurally sound, and artistically pleasing." 

The students taking Farm and Home Mechanics are expected to 
develop designs to be worked out as shop projects. A minimum of 
three designs is suggested for this section of the Course. 

Suggesf-ed Problems in Woodwork: 

Design for a gate-leg table, end-table, library table, radio case, 
piano bench, hall stand, writing desk, floor lamp standard and 
shade, chip carving panels or borders. 

Suggesf-ed Problems in Sheet-metal: 

1. Design contours for bowls, coke plates, book ends, plaques. 

2. Repousse designs for plaques, medallions, trays, trophy- 
shields, ornaments, door-knockers. 

3. Etched metal designs for ash-trays, desk sets, name-plates. 

4. Saw-pierced designs for objects similar to those in (2) and 
(3). 

Suggested Problems for Forging: 

Designs for grill, hearth-fender, lamp bracket, business-sign, um- 
brella-stand, footstool. 

Suggested Problems in Cement: 

Panel design, garden ornament. 

INTERIOR DECORATION. 

1. Study of the materials used. Collect samples, and name 
typical floor coverings, wall coverings, drapery and curtain 
fabrics, upholstery materials. 

2. Make floor plans (scale drawings) of the placing of furniture 
for balanced groups. 

3. Discuss — 

(a) Scale of furniture for rooms of various sizes. 

(b) Ratio of patterned area to plain area. 

(c) Colour in relation to exposure. 

(d) Value in ceiling, walls, trim, and floor. 

7 



4. Make elevations of the same room as made in floor plan, 
showing furniture and wall arrangements in colour. 

COSTUME DESIGN. 

This work should be a follow-up to the costume design of the 

Intermediate School. Figures sketched in the pose drawing may be 

used as lay-figures. On these develop clothing drawings based on 
design principles. 

Discuss the distinction between costume design and fashion draw- 
ing. 

Study line in dress. Strong lines, graceful lines, weak lines. Line 
by contours, line by pattern in material, line by trimmings, line by 
construction. Make drawings illustrating the use of these. Collect 
illustrations showing weak line. 

Discuss the effect of line correctly used to camouflage abnormali- 
ties. Draw clothing for short, slim type; tall, slender; short, stout; 
tall, angular; and tall, brood type. 

APPRECIATION OF APPLIED ARTS. 

This subdivision of the work is especially planned to correlate with 
Social Studies and the Farm and Home Mechanics Course. 

Moke collections of reproductions of examples. Mount these. 
This may be either a class collection, or individual collection. Class 
criticism. Stress fitness to purpose. 

Suggested Topics: 

Primitive Tribes: — tools, weapons, pottery utensils, articles of per- 
sonal adornment. 

Babylonian Arts. 

Egyptian: — furniture, jewelry, buildings. 

Greek: — pottery, metal objects, architecture, sculpture. 

Roman: — metal objects, glass (Pompeiian), architecture, sculpture. 

Byzantine: — mosaics, dress. 

Medieval: — manuscripts. Book of Kells, Objects in gold and 
silver. 

Renaissance: — ancient art, revived architecture, bronze sculpture. 

ART 2. 

Art 2 should be attempted only in schools having the necessary 
supplies, equipment and reference material; and only by teachers 
who hove hod advanced training in Art and present-day methods of 
Art instruction. 

Any four of the following six units will make a year's work: 

8 



I. PERIOD STUDIES OF PAINTING AND SCULPTURE. 

The study of Painting and Sculpture from prehistoric times to the 
Twentieth Century. 

Periods: Prehistoric painting, including that of the Indians of 
North and South America. Mesopotamian Art; early Aegean Art; 
Greek and Roman decoration, figure-painting and sculpture. Byzan- 
tine mosaics and painting; Romanesque and Gothic painting. (If 
rime permits, Flemish, German, Spanish, Dutch, English, American 
and modern painting.) 

Description of the use of various media: wax, fresco, egg, oil, 
water-colour. 

Reference: Illustrated Handbook of Art History (Macmillon Co.) 

II. CREATIVE DESIGN. 

Carry out work in lacquer^ oil, or water colour. Size or tempera* 
for the decoration of walls, furniture, boxes, etc. Block printing for 
fabrics. In this section, animal, bird, figure, insect and landscape 
forms should be practiced with brush. The study of rhythm and 
harmony in line and moss. Shape-filling and various treatments of 
units. 

Reference: Creative Design: Adolfo Best (Mougord). 

III. ILLUSTRATION. 

Block prints for end paper, using the various constructions. Inter- 
chamge and counterchonge stripe, ogee, brick, spot and sprig, dia- 
mond, square and rectangular half-drops. Units used should be con- 
nected with the story. Pen decoration for frontispiece and page illus- 
trations. Wash drawing and body colour. 

References: 

Drawing for Art Students: Seoby. 

Pen Drawing: El I wood. 

Reference Books on Durer, Viege, Doumier. 

IV. LETTERING. 

Pen writing (Johnston type); and Roman and Modern Egyptian. 

Gesso work — lampshade making; papier mache; lino and wood 
printing, using colour. 

V. STILL LIFE DRAWING, PAINTING AND COMPOSITION. 

(a) Freehand Perspective, 

Principles of perspective should be given for students interested in 
pictorial design. 

Composing of groups (various eye-levels). 

Drawing of interiors, furniture, open doors, windows, curtains and 
other hanging draperies. Charcoal and wash, pen and brush. 

9 



(b) Plant Form and Tree Form (Nature Drawing). 

The study of growth, tangential junction, flower construction. 
Pencil or brush, using local flowers and other plant life. 

(c) The Uses of Interchange in Composition of Landscape. 

(d) Figure. 

Construction — action poses; proportion. 

Composition — memory drawings of running, jumping, digging, 
riding, pushing, swinging, etc. Games and work. Built up from 
simple block or line forms. 

VI. INTERIOR DECORATION. 

Arrangement — proportion; uniformity; functionalism. 

Various methods of treating painted surfaces; stipple and broken 
grounds; painted decoration. Some decoration carried out full size. 

Students should be encouraged to make their own studies from 
nature, using ideas obtained from their surroundings. Figures they 
use should be people with whom they associate. 

References'. See List for Art 1 . 



10 



DRAMATICS 



DRAMATICS 1. 

INTRODUCTION 

The Grade IX course in Dramatics should be reviewed, intensified 
and further developed in Grade X. The plays chosen for production 
should be more difficult than the Grade IX plays. 

The course should be based on the project method; that is, the 
production of a programme of plays. The chronological outline of 
the course should be very loose, in order to give the teacher freedom 
in shaping the course to particular needs or inclinations. 

With the plays comes practice in the various theatre arts, — set- 
tings, costume, lighting, make-up and the making of properties. The 
occasional period can be taken to recapitulate the knowledge thus 
gained, a small amount of theory going hand in hand with practice. 
The class may study either a group of one-act plays or a full-length 
play; with large classes, short ploys may be used with duplicate 
casts; smaller classes may study a full length play. Exercises in 
Voice Production and Body Control will be required from time to 
time. 

At convenient times during the course, the pupils could report 
on plays they have read or seen, including moving pictures. Such 
reports could sometimes be given orally, and correlated with Voice 
Production, although too much emphasis should not be placed on 
this aspect of the work. 

The testing of the pupils' work should relate to the following: — 
(1) neatly kept scrap-books; (2) definite improvement in Speech, as 
evidenced by interpretative reading, sight reading of a prose passage, 
participation in a play, oral report on some phase of the year's work; 
(3) a carefully organized actor's or director's script; (4) the floor 
plan for a ploy; (5) active participation in a ploy, as actor, and, in 
some capacity, backstage — lighting, costuming, make-up, stage de- 
signing, directing, prompting. These objectives are flexible enough 
to set up definite standards of achievement, and to grade the pupils. 

1. VOICE AND DICTION: 

Review the work of the Intermediate School. 

Do not emphasize further study of this work, but give* continuous 
drill throughout the year. 

References: Voice and Speech Problems: Raubic'heck, Davis and 
Carll. 

Speech Education: Sara M. Barber. 

11 



2. APPRECIATION. 

Reading and discussion of one-act plays by teacher and class. 
Parts can be distributed and interchanged so that all pupils may 
have the opportunity to read. This can be done at the beginning of 
the term, or at intervals throughout the year. 

REFERBNCEs: The Stage and the School: Ommanney. 
Short Plays: Knickerbocker. 

3. SCRAP-BOOKS: 

Part of the course should consist in the preparation of a scrap- 
book containing material on the history of costumes in definite peri- 
ods, on furniture, modes of hairdressing, types of physiognomy, etc. 
This will be the student's work-book, and will be open to inspection. 
They may keep a bulletin board on which will be posted any 
dramatic or literary news of interest. 

(1) First method: Encourage each pupil to keep a scrap-book for 

himself. This method becomes difficult in a large class. 

(2) Second method: Have only a class scrap-book, to which each 

pupil will try to contribute. 

(3) The scrap-book may be of the ordinary kind, into which the 

material is pasted; or 

It may be a collection of ''mounts." The latter type of book 
is constructed in the following way. Let all the pupils mount 
their contributions (articles, sketches, illustrations of cos- 
tume, etc.) on pieces of stiff paper, all of the same size. 
These may be set up for inspection or reference, and later 
tied or bound together to form a scrap-book, and at the end 
of the term the pupils may take their mounts away if they 
wish. 

reference: The Stage and the School: Ommanney. 

4. ACTING: 

Review the work in Pantomime as outlined in the Intermediate 
School Programme of Studies, and extend the work to include 
characterization (vocal and pantomimic). 

The teacher may deal with Direction as a separate department of 
endeavour, or as a part of the work in the production of plays for 
the express purpose of giving training in Direction. This is just a 
matter of choice between the Discussion and the Project Methods. 
Although the Project Method is to be preferred, some teachers may 
prefer to use both. 

(1) Analysis of the play — type, mood, characterization, tempo, 

plot development, theme. 

(2) Planning the general action of the play, and as much of the 

"business" as possible. It is necessary to have the general 
action planned beforehand, and all action, business, etc., 
written into the MSS. Much of this may have to be changed 

12 



when the play goes into rehearsal, but a director must have 
a plan before he begins on the pupils. 

(3) Casting: For school-room production the teacher may cast 

against type, but for public production casting to type is a 
safer plan. 

(4) Reading the ploy aloud. Let no error be established. Some 

directors have several readings of the ploy before actual re- 
hearsal begins, but this method is apt to bore young people. 

(5) In the first few rehearsals pupils should retain their MSS. In 
fact, they should read the lines until they know the general 
routine movement and quite a bit of the business. 

(6) Memorizing lines. This should begin as soon as the pupils 

know the movement. Insist upon exactness at first; it is 
quite as easy to memorize the exact words as others sub- 
stituted by the pupil. As the play progresses, some pupils will 
slip in the odd error. If it fits in all right, let it go. They 
must always hove the cues right. 

(7) Rehearsal for continuity. When the cost know their stage 
movement and most of the business, and the lines pretty 
well, let them go through the play from first to last, with no 
directing whatever. Both cast and director will get a good 
idea of just where polish is needed most, and where the time 
should be quickened or slowed, etc. 

(8) Rehearsals for polish. Towards the end, bring in someone to 
be a sort of advance audience. This guest will have the 
effect of putting ''pep" into the cast. 

references: 

The Art of Play Production: John Dolman, Jr. 

General Principles of Play Production: Brown and Garwood. 

The Stage and the School: Ommonney. 

The Players^ Handbook: Selden. 

Drama and Dramatics: Fish. 

Amateur Acting and Play Production: Wayne Campbell. 

5. SETTING: 

For the discussion of principles involved in stage setting, use sev- 
eral plays, including the ones studied and some new ones. 

The perfect set should form an appropriate background for the 
mood of the play, and should satisfy the eye of the spectator. 

Study illustrations of exterior and interior settings. Pupils should 
be encouraged to collect illustrations for themselves. 

(1) Show the significance of the straight and the curved line. 

(2) Show what is accomplished by a variety of playing levels. 

(3) Study the placing of entrances and exits, and of windows, 
alcoves, doors, etc. 

13 



(4) The use of elements such as steps, pillar pieces, etc. 

(5) Colour in sets. (The background should be kept neutral.) 

(6) The placing of furniture. 

(7) The pupils should be required to design one or two sets. They 
should design the best sets possible and then adapt them to 
4^he limitations of their own stage. The designs should be 
as simple as possible, but nevertheless have some beauty. 

It is possible to teach the pupils the actual construction of flats, 
etc., if time allows. They would perhaps be interested in designing 
and making the set for the final play. 

The construction of a miniature stage may be one of the class 
activities; but only when the stage is related to a play actually in 
the course of production by the class. 

KEFERENCES: 

Amateur Acting and Play Production: Wayne Campbell. 

Scenery Simplified: Webster and Wetzel. 

Modern Theatre Practice: Heffner, Selden and Sellman. 

6. MAKE-UP: 

Make-up will probably have to be limited to demonstrations by the 
teacher, but if the expense can be borne, the pupils should try their 
hand at it. 

See that the pupils have a good understanding of straight juvenile 
make-up. 

reference: Time to Make-up: Whorf. 

7. COSTUME: 

One of the plays studied should be a costume ploy, for which the 
pupils will design the costumes. In some schools it may be possible 
for the pupils to moke the actual costumes or to make them in 
miniature for dolls. 

N.B. — No more work should be attempted than is required for 
the play or plays actually produced. 

reference: Stage Costuming: Agnes Brooks Young. 

8. LIGHTING: 

(1) Explain the purpose of lighting. 

(2) Emphasize effects rather than equipment; demonstrations 
rather than construction. However, as in other sections of 
the work, if time, resources and situation allow, pupils should 
be encouraged to make lighting equipment. 

(3) Plan the lighting for one or two plays. 

N.B. — No more work should be attempted than is required for the 
play or plays actually produced. 

14 



references: 

Modern Theatre Practice: Heffner, Selden and Sellman. 
A Method of Lighting the Stage: McCandless. 

9. STAGE PROPERTIES: 

The classes should engage in the making of properties for plays 
under production or for plays whose production is anticipated for 
other years or by other groups. This work offers opportunity for 
activity to pupils not particularly interested or talented in acting and 
directing. As a matter of fact, in large classes, there is no reason 
why there should not be some specialization; some pupils working 
chiefly at stagecraft while others find their greatest activity in acting 
or directing. 

Making of stage properties involves work in wood, clay, papier 
mache, plaster, metals, cloth, etc. It covers the making of any 
furniture, decorations, and costume accessories that might be needed 
for the performance of a play. 

reference: Small Stage Properties and Furniture: N. Cookson. 

10. EVALUATION OF FILM AND RADIO PLAYS: 

All high school students, whether or not they study dramatics, see 
plays in the moving pictures, or hear them on the radio. The dra- 
matics class gives the teacher an opportunity to help students develop 
a critical attitude towards current film or radio productions. 

The pupil should learn how properly to evaluate motion pictures, 
to distinguish between good and worthless films, and to knov wh\ 
this distinction exists. To a certain extent, films may be criticized 
in the same manner as stage plays, — for plot structure, characteriza- 
tion, dialogue, settings, and so on; but, beyond this, the pupil should 
evaluate those factors peculiar to motion pictures; such as camera 
angles and continuity. 

Pupils may give oral or written reports on motion pictures seen at 
their leisure. It would be better, however, to have class discussion 
the day following a group attendance at a film. As many films as 
desired, up to the number of seven, could be discussed in this man- 
ner. 

The motion picture exerts an important influence on the student's 
outlook. It is time the student, as a result of careful guidance, uses 
such discriminating taste that he will exert an important influence 
on the quality of motion pictures offered for his entertainment. If 
this can be achieved there will be a great forward step in raising the 
quality of cinema fare. 

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES 

In addition to the activities mentioned in various sections above, 
the following are suggested: 

1. Choral recitations. 

15 



2. Character monologues and sketches. 

3. Oral and written reviews of plays read. 

4. Presentation by individuals and groups of prepared panto- 
mimic characterizations. 

5: Group improvisations. 

6. The construction of model settings from original designs for 
specific plays. 

7. Original designs for settings sketched in colour. 

8. Make-up clubs practising with their own equipment outside 
school. 

9. Scrapbook collections of historical costumes, national cos- 
tumes, uniforms (historical and national). 

10. Designing of costumes in colours. 

11. Making of costumes from original designs, either for full- 
sized figures or for dolls. 

12. The making of simple floodlights, spotlights, border strips, 
footlights, dimmers and switchboards. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS OF PLAYS: 
Short Plays: Knickerbocker. 

BOOKS FOR THE REFERENCE LIBRARY 

The reference books listed under Dramatics in the Programme of 
Studies for the Intermediate School. 

The General Principles of Play Production: Brown and Garwood. 
Scenery Simplified'. Webster and Wetzel. 

Modern Theatre Practice (Text Edition): Heffner, Selden and Sell- 
man. 

Time to Make-up: Whorf. 

Small Stage Properties and Furniture: N. Cookson. 

A Method for Lighting the Stage: McCondless. 

DRAMATICS 2. 

(N.B. — Dramatics 1 is a prerequisite to Dramatics 2.) 

1. HISTORY OF THE DRAMA: 

A survey of Drama from the time of the Greeks, including the rise 
of the Mystery Play, Morality Play, and Interlude; the first real 
plays; Shakespeare and his contemporaries; Ibsen and the Moderns; 
trends of our own times. 

This will involve a survey of the development of the stage and the 
history of costume. 

Activities: If reference books are available, the students can col- 
lect their own material and build up their own survey, the teacher 

16 



acting as a guide. There should be reading of plays to illustrate the 
different dramatic periods, and phases of the drama. Students may 
make model stages and costume plates for specific plays. 



2. PLAY-WRITING: 

By this the students should learn something of the problems of 
plot advancement and characterization through dialogue and the 
development of conflict, suspense, and climax. 

Activities: 

(a) Outline plots, using newspaper clippings for suggestions. 

(b) Discuss reasons for writing plays, such as depicting interest- 
ing people, settings, plots, or presenting ideals or propagan- 
da. Modern "Plays of Protest," such as Bury the Dead or 
Waiting for Lefty will make valuable matter for the discus- 
sion. 

(c) Write brief dialogues in which there is some plot advance- 

ment and characterization. 

(d) Dramatize well known stories in History and Literature. 

(e) Write a one-act play suitable for class production. Select a 

setting you know; visualize your characters and situations; 
state your theme and write a synopsis of your plot before you 
begin the play. 

Present the best of the dramatizations and plays as class enter- 
prises. 

3. COSTUMING: 

As the history of costume has already been covered under Dra- 
matics 1, this part of the work should deal with the theory of line 
and colour. The importance of harmonious and correct costuming 
should be stressed. 

The following principles should be learned: 

(a) The line or silhouette must characterize the individual, estab- 

lish the historical period, form a part of the stage design and 
psychologically create the proper feeling in the actor and 
the audience. 

(b) The colours, which must be tried out under stage lights, create 
the atmosphere of personality and blend into the stage 
design. 

(c) The general effect of the complete costume is more im- 

portant than finish and detail. 

Activities: 

(a) Dress dolls to illustrate principles and periods 

(b) Make a model costume plate to illustrate the principles of 
costuming a play, using analogous colours for harmonious 
groups of characters and complementary colours for opposing 
groups. 

17 



(c) If the students hove already made costume plates in con- 
nection with Section 1, they need not make others. 

4. STAGE DESIGN: 

Discuss the principles of stage design. The principles of colour 
are much the same as those for costume. In the matter of line, 
tragedy and dignity are shown by straight lines; comedy, by short 
curves; excitement by jagged lines. 

Discuss realism in stage design; also symbolism, and stylization. 

Activities: 

(a) Plan line and colour schemes for plays read. 

(b) Design and make model set for some play discussed in Section 

1, or produced in Section 2, 

5. STUDY OF THE THREE-ACT PLAY: 

Discuss how it resembles and how it differs from the One-Act play. 

Read at least one Three-Act play in class for general discussion 
and illustration. 

Activities: 

Have students make reports of Three-Act ploys read, or seen on 
the stage, giving setting, synopsis of plot, theme, and personal 
criticism. 

6. PLAY PRODUCTION: 

The class may confine itself to One-Act plays, original or other- 
wise, or it may be ambitious enough to attempt a Three-Act play. In 
either case, there must be a review and extension of the study of 
the rules for acting, directing, lighting, and make-up, all of which 
have already been studied in Dramatics 1. 

For classes that may wish to produce a Three-Act play, the fol- 
lowing plays are recommended. They hove all been produced suc- 
cessfully by High School students. 

The Late Christopher Bean, by Sidney Howard. (This is the Ameri- 
can version. There is an English one which some may prefer.) 

The Taming of the Shrew, by Shakespeare. (''Acting'' editions are 
procurable. In these editions the play is cut and adapted for 
easy production.) 

Arms and the Man, by Bernard Shaw. 

One Hundred Years Old, by the Quintero Brothers. 

The Perfect Alibi, by Milne. 

Prunella, by Barker and Housman. 

She Stoops to Conquer, by Goldsmith. 

18 



RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOK OF PLAYS 

Short Plays: Knickerbocker. 

N.B. — There is a danger of making Dramatics 2 merely a lecture 
course. Such it must not be. Enoug.h practical work is suggested to 
give students a great deal of activity. 

BOOKS FOR THE REFERENCE LIBRARY: 

The Theatre: Shelden Cheney. 

The Craftsmanship of the One-Act Play: Pe re I vol Wilde. 
First Principles of Speech Training: Avery, Dorsey and Sickels. 
Introduction to Drama: Hubbell and Beaty. 
The Old Drama and the New: William Archer. 
Historical Costume for the Stage: Lucy Barton. 
A Method of Lighting the Stage: McCandless (Theatre Arts Pub. 
Co.) 



19 



MUSIC 



CREDIT FOR PRIVATE STUDY OF MUSIC. 

1. The Department will recognize for credit the certificates or 
diplomas of the principal Boards conducting examinations in 
Music in the Province. Standing in both Practical Profi- 
ciency and Theory is required. 

2. High-school students who have taken private instruction in 
instrumental Music or in vocal Music, including both Theory 
and Practical Proficiency, may be granted credits In Music 
1, 2 or 3 of the High-School Programme, on presenting to the 
Examinations Branch, Department of Education, Edmonton, 
one or more certificates or diplomas according to the require- 
ments set forth in the table on page 30 of this Bulletin. 

3. A student whose proficiency in pianoforte Music is judged 
and certified by a competent musician to be equal to that 
required for the practical examination shown below, and 
who also has taken regular high-school instruction in Theory 
and Music Appreciation as prescribed for the high-school 
course in Music 1, may be recommended for credits In 
Music 1 : 

Western Board of Music Grade V 

Toronto Conservatory of Music Grade VI 

McGill Conservator ium Junior Grade 

Associated Board of Royal Schools Grade V 

4. Students presenting documents from approved conservator- 
ies or examining boards which entitle them to credits in 
Music 2 or 3 of the High-School Programme may be grant- 
ed credits also in Music 1, or Music 2, or Music 1 and 2, as 
the case may be, with the following provisions: 

(i) Such students shall submit to the Examinations Branch 
of the Department of Education a statement from a 
competent musician certifying that they have prepared, 
properly and satisfactorily, the selections prescribed for 
the conservatory grades corresponding to Music 1, or 
Music 2, or both, as the case may be, or other selections 
recognized as equivalent thereto. 

(ii) Such students shall not be granted more than 37 high- 
school credits In one year; and of these 37 credits, not 
more than 4 shall be granted in Music. 

WESTERN BOARD OF MUSIC 

The Universities and Departments of Education of Alberta, Sas- 
katchewan and Manitoba, acting through the Western Board of 
Music, conduct a series of Local Examinations in Music, Practical 

20 



and Theoretical, extending from the First Grade to the Professional 
Diplomas of Associate and Licentiate. In Alberta, these examina- 
tions ore administered by the University of Alberta. Practical exami- 
nations are held at various centres during the months of May or 
June. Written examinations in the Theory of Music may be held 
at any local centre, by special arrangement, during February, May 
or June. 

Further information concerning these examinations may be ob- 
tained by writing to Professor John Reymes-King, Department of 
Fine Arts, University of Alberta, Edmonton. The syllabus issued 
by the Western Board of Music may also be obtained upon request 
to Professor John Reymes-King. 

GENERAL STATEMENT ON HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE. 

The aims of the High School Music Course are three: — to deepen 
the student's love of good music; to enable him to better understand 
what he hears or performs; and to develop his performing technique. 

The effects upon the student in the pursuit of these aims may be 
listed as follows: 

(a) Increasing appreciation and understanding of good music. 

(b) Widening his experience of the art. 

(c) Acquiring the habit of concentration upon musical values. 

(d) Discovering to the student the kind and strength of his 
musical interests and aptitudes. 

(e) Providing an avenue for the furtherance of his social co- 
operation. 

(f) A general refining influence. 

(g) Developing technique in performance. 

A fully rounded-out Music Course for High Schools includes the 
following departments of musical activity and study: 

1. Chorus Singing. 

2. Elementary Theory. 

3. Ear-training and Sight-singing. 

4. Music Appreciation. 

5. Harmony. 

6. Orchestra (or Band). 

7. Glee Club. 

Chorus singing is the basic musical activity in any school Music 
Course. It requires careful management in the assignment of voice 
to parts; in the choice of material as related to physiological as well 
as psychological maturity and technical ability of the student; also 
in the purpose underlying the plan of procedure. Success should 
not be measured in proportion to the physical exhilaration manifest- 
ed in singing, but the work should be viewed from the standpoint of 

21 



a choral study-class. Music should be selected to illustrate specific 
points of interpretation, style, form, and period of composition. It 
should, at all times, be the joyous endeavour of the chorus to make 
advancement in production of the voices, beauty of tone, balance of 
the parts, incisive enunciation, well-moulded phases, flexibility, pre- 
cision, shading, mood and imagination. 

While in Grade IX the emphasis may we-ll be upon songs whose 
texts carry a strong emotional appeal, in Grades X, XI, and XII more 
attention should be given to music in its absolute phase. Divested 
of text, the music in these Grades should lose nothing of its interest. 
Beauty of tone blending, tone procedure forming beautiful melodic 
contour and balance of phrases, part leading, and beautiful har- 
monic progressions, form a tonal discourse that should engage the 
keen interest of the class and nourish the appreciation of musical 
texture and mood. Music if not studied for itself can hardly lay 
claim to a deserved place on the curriculum. 

Class work in elementary theory, ear-training, and sight-singing is 
necessary to give the student a period of concentrated study in the 
mechanics of musical construction, for the purpose of imparting an 
intimacy with the elements of musical notation. In training the 
aural recognition of all commonly occurring rhythmic types and 
figures, as well as chromatic inflections, it is an important adjunct 
to the Chorus Singing Course. Such a class is especially valuable in 
schools where a number of the students have had no public school 
music training. 

A certain amount of incidental study of music appreciation may 
be carried on in conjunction with the chorus class; it is, however, 
necessarily limited in scope, being confined to the particular music 
or composer under study. A more comprehensive Course in the 
appreciation of music is a vital necessity in High Schools, to provide 
an opportunity for a broad outlook over the field of music in general. 
Such a course is particularly suitable in Grades X, XI, and XII, 
following the musical experience gained in Grade IX. The habit 
of critical listening is cultivated. Lessons ore derived through the 
hearing of a considerable quantity of the best music literature; and 
on intelligent idea of music forms, history, biography, and aesthetics 
is gained therefrom, which, in the main, constitutes the work in 
music appreciation. 

Such a course is mode practicable through the use of phonographic 
records. The development of music form and styles can be traced 
from the earliest times. The distinctive style of individual com- 
posers and of "schools" of composers can be comprehended. The 
various media of musical expression can be illustrated. Biogroohies 
of great composers and musical executants may be taught, and the 
main themes of great compositions, through repeated hearings, com- 
mitted to memory. It bears the same relation to music education 
as the subject of Literature, and its history, bears to the study of 
English. 

Harmony properly applied in the High School should mean ear- 
training of an advanced order as compared with that received in the 

22 



earlier Music Courses. It is an exploration of the conventional chord 
material upon which music is constructed. While the study must 
necessarily involve a consideration of the laws by which chords are 
grammatically connected, the study must not be allowed to lapse into 
the mechanical working of exercises whose main purpose is to train 
one in the avoidance of errors in part-writing. Rather, should it be 
to the purpose of enabling the student to give a proper harmonic 
setting to the products of his musically creative instincts. Rules 
should follow, rather than precede, practice. There should be more 
harmonizing of melodies than of figure basses. The taste should be 
cultivated for aptness and purity of effect in chord arrangements, 
progressions, and part-leading. 

When orchestra classes are maintained in Public Schools, there will 
be no difficulty in organizing fair-sized orchestras in the High 
Schools. But, even where such classes have not existed, all High 
Schools should, if at all possible, organize orchestras. The nucleus 
may be nothing more than a few violins and a piano. With sym- 
pathy from the school staff and educational authorities, interest will 
be generated and other instruments added. It may then become 
the duty of the local School Board to provide teachers for classes in 
violin, clarinet, cornet, etc., and to procure for the school those in- 
struments not so popularly found in the homes, as the flute, oboe, 
'cello, French horn, stringed boss, and drums, and also make some 
provision for instruction on them. 

Glee Clubs should be drawn from the chorus classes of Grades X, 
XI and XII, the voices selected by test. Clubs of not more than 32 
to 36 (8 or 9 to a port) do the best work. By reason of their more 
advanced vocal proficiency, they are able to do chorus work of a 
finer quality and more difficult grade than produced in the regular 
chorus classes. 

The chief aim of the Music Course is to enable pupils to acquire 
increasing enjoyment in music, both in school and in later life. The 
Course does not aim to produce professional musicians. 

MUSIC 1. 

Chorus Singing. 

While the study and performance of part-songs and choruses 
should feature more prominently than in Grade IX, a certain number 
of unison songs should be included, these latter more particularly for 
the individual sections of the chorus. The music selected should 
represent folk-songs, classical songs, songs with descant, and mod- 
ern port songs. Rounds, canons, and other music, with imitative 
part-movement, should be studied. Variety in the style of music 
used is desirable. While easy cantatas may be used, a class spend- 
ing most of the year in preparing a cantata would fail in meeting 
the requirements of the Course. 

Part-songs are for — 

(a) Soprano and alto; soprano and second soprano; soprano and 
bass; tenor and bass. 

23 



(b) Soprano, second soprano and alto; soprano, alto and bass; 
soprano (or alto), tenor and bass. 

(c) Soprano, alto, tenor and bass. 

Part-songs including tenor or bass are optional, as some schools 
may be unable to find a sufficient number of tenor or bass voices. 

Recommended Song-books. 

The Music Hour, Book Ml (Gage & Co.) 
Halcyon Song Book (Silver Burdett Company.) 
Canfemns, Book I (Curwen Company). iCantemus is for soprano, 
alto, and bass only.) 

Junior Songs; Mollis Dann (American Book Company). 

The Silver Book (Music of Many Lands and Peoples) (Silver Burdett). 

The Silver Book of Songs for all Grades (Gordon V. Thompson). 

A full list of supplementary song-books, operettas, carols, rounds, 
canons, songs with descant, individual part-songs, etc., will be sup- 
plied on request, from the Department of Education. 

Elementary Theory. 

Relative values of all notes and rests in common use. The tie; 
the slur; sharps, flats, naturals, double sharp, and double flats. 
Treble and bass clefs; the alto and tenor C clefs. All major and 
minor scales with their signatures. Tones and semitones; accent; 
measures; time signatures, in both simple and compound time. 
Irregular note-groups to the beat. The barring of simple passages. 
Tempo indications, marks of expression and interpretation in com- 
mon use. The technical names of the scale degrees. Intervals and 
their inversions. 

Recommended for Use as Text-books. 

Stewart Macpherson: Rudiments of Music. 

Charles W. Pearce: Rudiments of 3Iusical Knowledge. 

Ear-training and Sight-singing. 

1. Recognizing and staff notating in any of the nine common 
keys, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-note phrases, including no other chro- 
matics than the sharpened 4th fi, and the flattened 7th te. 
The two chromatics in their simplest progression only. Dis- 
tinguishing amongst 2-pulse, 3-pulse, 4-pulse, and 6-pulse 
measure in sentences sung or played. Aural recognition of 
the simpler rhythmical types and figures. Writing on a line 
of the staff the rhythmical outline of a musical motive sung 
or played. Applying the so-fa names to short groups and 
phrases. Recognition of major and minor triads in root 
positions and inversions, when played on the piano; also 
distinguishing any of the notes of a 3-part chord after hear- 
ing the chord played; distinguishing the tone qualities of 
the more common orchestral instruments in each of the 
orchestral sections. 

24 



2. Regular practice in sight-singing. For this purpose, exer- 
cises may be found in 777 Graded Exercises in Sight Singing 
for Schools (Eagleson), published by the Institute of Applied 
Art, Edmonton. 

Music Appreciation. 

The purpose is to acquaint the student with the great literature of 
music in such a way that he may study it in the light of the times in 
which it was composed, and note the manner of development of its 
various forms. The success of the Course depends on the presenta- 
tion of a considerable amount of music arranged to show the pro- 
gress of musical art from the earliest times. Some of the more 
impressive themes from masterpieces and other works representative 
of a composer's individual style should be memorized. 

The Course should include short, pointed lessons on the rise and 
development of opera and oratorio, and brief, biographical studies of 
the great masters, supported by performance of excerpts from their 
more celebrated works. 

In review and extension of the Appreciation Course set for Grade 
IX, the following are the topics under which the Course will be 
conducted: 

The various media of musical expression. 

Vocal classifications: — the soprano voice, alto, tenor, baritone, 
bass; their differentiations, as, lyrics, dramatic, coloratura, 
robusto. 

Vocal and choral combinations. 

Further studies in the quality and capability of orchestral instru- 
ments. 

Instrumental and orchestral combinations. 

The simple elements of form, growing out of a consideration of 
balance of design in melodic construction. 

Song types: — folk-song, popular song, patriotic song, ballad, lied, 
aria, chanson, art-song. 

Opera and oratorio: — their form features illustrated. Selections 
from these large music forms showing development from period 
to period. 

Instrumental forms: — music illustrative of suites, dance forms, 
the fugue, sonatas, string quartettes, overtures, the symphony, 
tone poems. 

Note-books should be kept by the pupils in which the outline of 
each lesson is recorded. The books should, periodically, be exam- 
ined and marked. 

Recommended as Text-books for Use of Students: 

Music: Crelghton (Chatto and Windus). 

The Student's Work-hook in Music Appreciation (Clarke, Irwin 
Company). 

25 



Music Enjoyment and Appreciation, Parts I and II: Yocom (Ryer- 
son Press.) 

Reference Books for Students: 

The Story of Music: Barbour and Freeman (Burchard, Boston). 
The Gateway to Music: Blancke and Speck (D. C. Heath & Co.) 
The Good Musician, Parts I, II, III and IV. 

Reference Books for Teachers: 

The Teacher's Handbook for the Student's Workbook in Music Ap- 
preciation (Clarke, Irwin Company). 

Listening Lessons in Music: Fryberger (Silver, Burdett Co.) 

What We Hear in Music (R.C.A. Victor Co.). (In this book will 
be found complete lists of phonographic records, with descrip- 
tions and numbers, to support the above outline of work.) 

Music and Romance: Hazel Kinscella. 

Victor Book of Symphony. 

Victor Book of Opera. 

Choral Technique and Interpretation: Dr. Henry Coward (Novel lo). 

99%: Dr. Stalin (Curwen). 

Dictionary of Musical Terms: Elson. 

Orchestra or Band. 

Musical practice undertaken through membership in a school 
orchestra or band will be accepted for credit in lieu of the course 
in Music 1 or Music 2, provided that the following conditions have 
been met: 

1. The orchestra or bond must be under the direction or super- 
vision of the school. 

2. The members must meet regularly for practice under a 
competent conductor, the practice sessions occupying at least 
four half -hour periods per week, of which one shall be taken 
for Theory and for Music Appreciation alternately. 

3. It must master a repertory of at least ten selections during the 
year, these to be of medium difficulty, of good quality, and 
representing different types. 

Such music as the following will be regarded as satisfactory: 
Orchestra: 

Selections from Faust (No. 190), (Oliver Ditson Company). 
Arabian Nights Suite (No. 351), (Oliver Ditson Company). 
Ditson Concert Orchestra Folio (15 and P.), (Oliver Ditson Co.) 
Amateur Orchestra Folio (15 and P.), (Oliver Ditson Co.). 
Bohemian Girl (arranged by Barnard), (Filmore Music House). 
Moment Musical (Schubert), (Carl Fischer Company). 
Album Leaf (Wagner), (Carl Fischer Company). 

26 



Amateur Orchestra Journal^ Volumes II, III, and V. 
Progressive Orchestra Booh (Willis Music Company). 

string Orchestra: 

Operatic Airs (Recker), (6 first violins, 4 seconds, 1 'cello); (Leo 

Feist Publishing Company). 
Minuet, No. 2 in G (Beethoven), (Carl Fischer Company). 
Dawn of Love (Bendix), (Carl Fischer Company). 

Band: 

March, Boy Scouts (G. L. Barnhouse Company). 

Chimes of Normandy, No. 4 (Oliver Ditson Company). 

Selections from Tannhauser (Wagner) No. 1181 (Fillmore Music 

House.) 
Operatic Reminiscences (Amateur Concert Journal) (Carl Fischer 

Company). 
Overture Northern Lights (Walter Jacobs.) 
March Legion of Honor (J. W. Pepper & Son). 

Glee Club. 

The members of this Club may be drawn from Grades X, XI, and 
XII. The better voices of the chorus class are selected by test, and 
G good balance of parts obtained. The Club should not be less than 
16 in number, nor more than 38. Provided that they are under effi- 
cient conducting, meet for practice twice a week throughout the 
school year, and that the quality of the work done is of a higher 
standard than that of the chorus class, they may select Glee Club in 
lieu of Ear-training and Sight-singing. 

Song-hooks: 

Hollis Dann: Assembly Songs, Vols. I and II (H. W. Gray Com- 
pany). 

Universal Song Book (Hinds, Hoyden & Eldredge). 

{Assembly Songs are for girls' voices only; the Universal Song 
Book is for various combinations of voices, including alto-tenor, 
and optional and required bass parts.) 

A list of individual part-songs, published in octavo form, may 
be obtained by applying to the Department of Education. 

Requirements. 

The requirements for Music 1 are as follows: 

Chorus Singing, with Ear-Training and 

Sight-Singing 2 periods a week. 

Elementary Theory 1 period a week. 

Music Appreciation 1 period a week. 

Th teacher may, however, vary from this schedule according to the 
needs of the class. 

27 



MUSIC 2. 
Chorus Singing. 

Grade XII pupils selecting Chorus may unite with those of Grade 
XI in making up the personnel of this class. In small schools the 
class may be formed from the whole student body. 

Song Books: 

(a) 'Assembly Songs, Vols. I & II: Mollis Donn (H. W. Gray Co.). 
These are for girls' voices only. 

(b) Glee and Chorus Book: NeCollins (American Book Co.) 

For a list of individual part-songs and cantatas apply to the De- 
partment of Education. 

The musical director will test the voices of all those applying for 
membership in the Chorus Class. The test is for the purpose of a 
correct assignment to parts and the elimination of any who, by 
reason of having a poor voice, could, in the opinion of the director, 
neither contribute to nor benefit from the course. The test will in- 
clude one in fairly easy sight-singing. 

Elementary Theory. 

As set for Grade X with the following additions: 

Chromatic scale, writing in harmonic and melodic forms; syn- 
copation; transposition from clef to clef and from key to key. Triads 
and their inversions; arranging root position of major and minor 
common chords for soprano, alto, tenor and bass voices. The chord 
of the Dominant Seventh and its inversions; writing the principal 
and deceptive resolutions of the Dominant Seventh. All chord ar- 
rangements to be mode in close score. 

Ear-Training and Sight-Singing. 

(a) Recognizing and staff notating (in any but the most extreme 
keys) 5, 6, 7 and 8-nofe phrases which may include fi, si, ri, te^ 
le, me in their simpler progressions. Tapping short, rhythmi- 
cal phrases after hearing them sung or played by the teacher. 
Singing the lower part of short, two-part phrases played on 
the piano. Singing the lowest, middle or highest tones of 
any three tones sounded together on the piano, singing the 
intervals of a perfect fifth, on octave, perfect fourth, major 
third, minor third and major sixth above a given tone. 

(b) Regular practice in Sight-Singing, using for material the 
exercises in Books III and IV of '^777 Graded Exercises in 
Sight Singing for Schools" (Eagleson), published by The In- 
stitute of Applied Art, 109 Street, Edmonton. 

Music Appreciation. 

The influence of nationality on music. Folk music of different 
nations reflecting the character of the people and the mould of their 
musical thought; related to geographical and political aspect of 

28 



country. A general review of the course in Music Appreciation as 
set for Grade X, with provision for appreciation in orchestra, band or 
qlee club activities. 

History — The life and work of any two of the following com- 
posers: Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, 
Wagner, Elgar, Debussy, illustrated by recordings of their works. 

Textbooks — As listed for Grade X Appreciation. 

Recommended Reference Books — As listed for Grade X Apprecia- 
tion with the following additions: 

Outlines of Musical History: — Hamilton (Oliver Ditson Co.) 
Summary of Musical History: — Parry (Novel I o). 

Suitable phonographic records in support of the above topics are 
given in Anne Shaw Faulkner's ''What We Hear in Music" (see 
Grade X course) in which book, also, the topics are discussed. 

Orchestra or Band. 

Pupils in Grades XI and XII taking Orchestra will do so in the 
general orchestral ensemble along with Grade X. See note on 
Orchestra under Grade X for the regulations governing this activity. 

Glee Club. 

See note under Glee Club, Grade X. Membership is accepted in 
lieu of the course in Ear-Training and Sight-Singing. 

Requirements. 

The requirements for Music 2 are as follows: 

Chorus Singing, with Ear-Training and 

Sight-Singing 2 periods a week. 

Elementary Theory, including Harmony 1 period a week. 

Music Appreciation 1 period a week. 

The teacher may, however, vary from this schedule according to 
the needs of the class. 

MUSIC 3. 

Music 3 is not a course in high-school Music. Students will not, 
therefore, be granted credits in Music 3 for classroom instruction. 
Students may, however, take private instruction; and on completing 
the requirements for standing in Music 3, as set forth in the Table 
on page 30 with respect to the recognized Examining Boards, such 
students may be granted credits in Music 3. 



29 





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